March 24th, 2020 by Mark Laurence

This is the third in a four-part series. In previous articles (links at bottom) I talked about the spontaneous regeneration on brownfield sites in the UAE and the utilisation of seeded landscapes to create semi-natural ecosystems without irrigation. Another factor of these landscapes would be to make them productive in a way that would enrich the soils of not just that landscape but, by the production of useful products, returning fertility to the soil for both the site concerned and also urban landscapes and gardens elsewhere.

Sesbania sesban, a nitrogen-fixing shrub or small tree

Coppice woodland is not a term that you normally associate with the Middle East, yet there are many trees, both native and introduced, that would work in this manner. So what would be the point? Well, we have become used to landscapes being either for agriculture, or for ornament, yet this simplification overlooks the fact that we can have landscapes that are multi-functional and that they can also be productive in other ways.

To understand this concept, we should look to agroforestry, or forest gardens, where multi-functionalism is the order of the day. We think of these systems as being in tropical or temperate regions, yet there are many plants that can be organised and used in this fashion in arid lands. I want to focus this article on one aspect only, the production of biomass. Biomass has multiple functions: the production of poles for building and firewood, compost, and when shredded, mulch. We can produce biochar, which is seen as an increasingly important part of long-term soil enrichment and carbon sequestration. There are also food and fodder crops which would be a valuable product, dependent upon species. And of course, verdant biomass supports verdant wildlife.

Eucalyptus street tree, Abu Dhabi. Note the epicormic growth from the base

Many of these plants are also nitrogen-fixers and these are especially valuable for building fertility and assisting the development of other species. Whilst some may have allelopathic properties, which inhibit the germination of other seedlings within the root zone, my general observation is that this is not particularly effective, nor a problem.

So a list of trees that would grow in the Middle East unirrigated, can be coppiced and are nitrogen fixers, would include:

  • Acacia saligna
  • Acacia (Senegalia) senegal
  • Acacia tortilis
  • Albizia lebbeck
  • Leucaena leucocephala
  • Pithocellobium dulce
  • Prosopis cineraria (possibly)
  • Prosopis juliflora
  • Sesbania sesban
Strong epicormic growth is ideal for coppice. Prosopis juliflora

Other species, coppicable but non-nitrogen fixing, would include:

  • Azadirachta indica (assumed from observed regrowth)
  • Conocarpus lancifolius (assumed from observed regrowth)
  • Eucalyptus sp.
  • Ficus sp.
  • Moringa oleifera
  • Tamarix sp.
  • Ziziphus spina-christi
Ziziphus spina-christi, showing classic epicormic growth

There will be many other species that could fit these lists, but it’s a start. Many ornamental trees, such as Millingtonia and even Delonix show tendencies to throw up epicormic growth from wounds and therefore, in theory might coppice, but I am concentrating on trees which can do this without irrigation.

It’s important to say right here that this shouldn’t ever be designed as a monoculture; there is sound ecological reasons to to maximise the diversity of a planting. Naturally, you wouldn’t use everything, for conditions will suit some better than others for any given site. Nor would you coppice everything all at the same time. Staggering the harvest evens out the work-flow but more importantly, creates communities of plants at different stages of growth. The “edge zones” are always where the greatest biodiversity occurs, for you get the overlap of differing ecologies. Whilst each species will have it’s own regrowth rate and optimum cutting cycle, this can also be varied, according to the use of the product.

Of course, there is a problem, for many of these species are incredibly thorny, which is a real issue for those carrying out the coppice-work. Young vigorous growth also tends to have the most vicious thorns! On a larger scale, it may be possible to use forestry-style Forwarder tractor-trailer units to collect the brush and load it directly into the chipping machine hopper, without human intervention. Someone’s still got to cut it and do initial handling though.

Ziziphus stump, showing strong epicormic regrowth

So how do we express this idea, of coppiced woodlands, arid-land style? it would depend on context but there are several approaches we could take. On a large scale, machine operated (as mentioned above), we would have to do traditional layouts with alleys or rows, firebreaks etc. Mixed planting though, would be preferable although strips of one species are possible. If kept narrow, with different species to either side, the effect ecologically would be similar to mixed planting.

In smaller areas, or where human interaction is intended, then these could take the form of the mixed, seeded landscapes that I discussed in my previous article. In other words, we can combine the function with the elements of aesthetics and ecological diversity. Not to mention desert reclamation. Remember, all this is proposed as unirrigated land. The verges along main roads are a prime candidate, instead of over-manicured lawns and hedges that you see at many junctions.

My next article will discuss design, the knowledge and training needed for the creation of such landscapes. I believe we could transform the landscapes of the Middle East, without the intensive irrigation that is required by conventional approach.


First and second articles in this series:

Posted in Abu Dhabi, Adaptive Planting, Agroforestry, Brownfield regeneration, Climate Change, Coppice, Ecosystem Services, Environment, landscapes, Middle-East, Natural Landscapes, Regenerative Planting, Sustainability, Trees, Treescapes, Uncategorized, woodland Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , ,

March 13th, 2020 by Mark Laurence

In part one of this four-part series, I discussed the colonization of brownfield sites in the UAE’s cities with a range of trees and shrubs – almost all of them “exotic invasive” species.  I argued that these could be forming the basis of new, adapted ecologies.  To revise those arguments, please the link at the end of this article.  The next question is, once we accept this premise, how do we create these new ecologies as a conscious expression of our own adaptation to climate change?

A self-seeded landscape, Abu Dhabi

First, let’s understand that we need these landscapes to be unirrigated.  Why? Well, in the Middle East especially, water is a precious resource and expensive; the UAE is particularly bad, with a per capita use of 550 litres/day.  So with landscaping, let’s keep the irrigation for the urban centres, parks and gardens.  If we just focused, for example, on all the miles of roads and interchanges between Dubai, Abu Dhabi and Al Ain that are irrigated, and imagine these replaced with unirrigated greenery, the water saving from this alone would be massive.  Yet that is an immense challenge, for as soon as you plant something in a desert, you must water it.

If we want a vibrant plant ecology, then we also need a vibrant soil ecology, something that conventional landscaping ignores completely

I think this is the key, that planting in such a climate rarely establishes without help, whereas seeds can.  What we need therefore, is a methodology of establishing and maintaining, seeded landscapes.

Flowers of Prosopis juliflora attracts bees and insects

It is true that in a scenario where we are consciously creating an unirrigated landscape, we would want to greatly increase the odds of establishment.  In this respect, much detailed assessment would need to be given to soil amelioration.  If we want a vibrant plant ecology, then we also need a vibrant soil ecology; this is crucial and something that conventional landscaping ignores completely.

Can we create a healthy soil, rich with microbial activity and naturally water retentive in such an arid climate?  I think we can, but we must first change our thinking from one of assisting landscapes with external inputs (irrigation) to that of creating self-sufficient ones, with cyclical, living, self-sustaining ecologies. Soil becomes the vital kingpin in all this, not just an anchorage medium for plants. 

Native soils need to be worked with, not replaced.  They can be moderated, made more moisture retaining, but basics like salinity and pH will always dictate plant choice.  First and most important, is to increase the soil’s water retention capacity. There are a number of ways to do this, involving additives which may incorporate clays, granules or other water-holding mediums and we know that when used in irrigated landscapes, they can reduce water demand by up to 50%. Given that an unirrigated landscape might have periods of time when it is extremely dry, we need a medium that doesn’t become hydrophobic if it does dry out and that will react swiftly to absorb water when it does arrive.

Sesbania sesban, a nitrogen-fixing shrub

We can also inoculate the soil with mycorrhizal fungi cultured from local, healthy environments to enhance soil micro-ecology; there is little point in importing this from another part of the world, as the relevant strains of microbes are likely absent.  Microbes and bacteria are the essence of good soil. Many of the plants used will be nitrogen-fixers, and so live in a symbiosis with certain bacteria. They also make nitrogen available to other species, as cycles of life and decay build up.

Organic matter is also essential, but perhaps the most problematic element as it is in short supply. One aspect of the practical usage of such landscapes, and a part of the long-term management, can be the coppicing of trees and shrubs for biomass to make compost. Organic matter tends to oxidise if conditions are not conducive, so we need to get things right, but I’m sure that even desert soils can sequester carbon, given the right conditions.

We would need to mix these various elements into the soil to the appropriate depth, perhaps a metre, probably by air injection, and possibly to different depths for the different mediums. Soil preparation becomes the most major, one-time investment in the land but will pay back endlessly over the lifetime of the landscape.

Black Carpenter bees on Leucaena leucocephala

Once the preparation is done we have to seed the land, when conditions are optimal (not when contract deadlines require); this would have to be timed after rain, if possible.  Otherwise, I would give the land a soaking, with our soil amendments helping to retain the moisture, then apply seed, in a variety of ways, possibly by hydra-seeding.  Finally, a locally-sourced stone mulch should be placed over all, to again help retain moisture, but not too thick to inhibit germination.  This would be the entirety of the preparation and installation work. 

Next is the nurturing stage, followed by on-going management and maintenance; this will be very different from a conventional landscape, but no less intensive, at least for the first few years. It may be beneficial to give additional watering to aid plants as they germinate and establish, but this must be done with care, or seedlings could be washed away. We would need to give enough to ensure success, but no more.

Once established, these plants would grow at whatever speed the conditions allowed and a new landscape would emerge over time. Thinning out and reseeding of failed areas would be the main work, acts of stewardship rather than maintenance. Prunings shredded and spread as mulch, soils fit to support life, insects, animals and birds would soon make this place their home. The result would be a slow and genuine landscape uplift into the realms of a new and adapted ecology.


How we design such landscapes, choose which plants to use, obtain the seed and know how to maintain them, is the subject of the next article.

The first article of this four part series is:

Posted in Abu Dhabi, Adaptive Planting, Brownfield regeneration, Climate Change, Dry Garden, Dubai, UAE, Landscape Futurism, landscapes, Middle-East, Natural Landscapes, Planting Design, Regenerative Planting, Sustainability, Trees Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , ,